A CRUSADER'S LEGACY OF RESEARCH LIVES ON

One of the greatest crusaders for vitamins died last month of cancer. Linus Pauling, Ph.D., the son of a pharmacist, was 93. Pauling, who valued his Nobel Prize for peace over his Nobel Prize for chemistry, took 18,000 milligrams of vitamin C a day. Pauling maintained the vitamin C delayed the onset of his cancer for 20 years.For now, many researchers are less certain than Pauling was about the impact

One of the greatest crusaders for vitamins died last month of cancer. Linus Pauling, Ph.D., the son of a pharmacist, was 93. Pauling, who valued his Nobel Prize for peace over his Nobel Prize for chemistry, took 18,000 milligrams of vitamin C a day. Pauling maintained the vitamin C delayed the onset of his cancer for 20 years.

For now, many researchers are less certain than Pauling was about the impact of vitamins on cancer and other diseases in light of some recent mixed results.

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