SURVEY: MEDIA ALONE CAN'T TEACH FOOD SAFETY

HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. -- Changes in food safety practices in the home are most likely to come from education and intervention, not the media, according to a telephone survey conducted by Audits International, here.The poll, a follow-up to the firm's 1997 survey on the same topic, focused on a sample group of more than 100 people, 35 of whom participated in the original study; the rest were a control

HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. -- Changes in food safety practices in the home are most likely to come from education and intervention, not the media, according to a telephone survey conducted by Audits International, here.

The poll, a follow-up to the firm's 1997 survey on the same topic, focused on a sample group of more than 100 people, 35 of whom participated in the original study; the rest were a control group described as "typical homemakers."

The survey sought to determine if the

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