Effects of Stimulus Checks Negated by Price Increases: Study

The $92 billion in stimulus checks sent out by the U.S. government so far has been more than offset by higher consumer prices, according to recent research from IHL Group.

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — The $92 billion in stimulus checks sent out by the U.S. government so far has been more than offset by higher consumer prices, according to recent research from IHL Group here. For the twelve months ending Aug. 1, consumer prices for fuel and food increased $132.4 billion, causing stimulus checks to be used for debt reduction instead of discretionary spending, IHL Group said. “Every sustained one-cent increase in fuel prices takes $1.7 billion a year out of U.S. consumers’ p

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