DANNON KID PACKS SUPPORT ENVIRONMENTAL FUND

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. -- Relationship marketing has moved into the dairy case with Dannon Danimals, a six-pack of yogurt for kids. For every sale of the blended yogurt six-packs, Dannon Co.here will donate 1.5% of the purchase price to the National Wildlife Federation, Washington, the nation's largest private, nonprofit conservation education organization."It's a perfect fit," said Robert Davino, product

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. -- Relationship marketing has moved into the dairy case with Dannon Danimals, a six-pack of yogurt for kids. For every sale of the blended yogurt six-packs, Dannon Co.here will donate 1.5% of the purchase price to the National Wildlife Federation, Washington, the nation's largest private, nonprofit conservation education organization.

"It's a perfect fit," said Robert Davino, product manager at Dannon. It not only advances the wildlife cause directly by educating consumers through package graphics, but also is expected to generate $300,000 to $500,000 per year for NWF, he said.

The long-term agreement, believed to be the first in the category, is a win-win situation for everyone -- Dannon, NWF, the trade and consumers, he added.

"We're constantly looking for ways to satisfy consumer needs. We know that yogurt consumers with kids tend to have interest in outdoor activities and the environment, so we were looking for another way to add value, another reason for consumers to feel good about buying our products," he explained.

"Danimals, with its child-size six-packs of 4.4-ounce cups, fits the criteria," he said. The flavors and graphics reflect one of three habitats: Jungle, Forest or Arctic. The Jungle six-pack flavors are tropical, such as tropical punch and orange/banana; the Forest six-pack features strawberry and blueberry and the Arctic is vanilla.

Cup label and lidstock graphics by Cornerstone Design Associates, New York, are designed to work together to present a consistent message. "We wanted a realistic look. We wanted the animals to be nonthreatening and consistent with their habitat," said Davino.

"The design had to appeal to both mothers, the gatekeepers for the purchase, and the children," explained Christopher Nunes, managing director at Cornerstone. The design had to communicate to the mother that this is a wholesome product with some educational value, yet offer an involving, fun aspect for kids. It also had to work effectively within the dairy case. The six-pack is generally sold from the well, which makes the top the principal display panel. Once the lidstock is removed, cup graphics encourage repeat purchases.

The three Danimals six-packs were launched in April and now are available nationally in supermarkets and club stores. Marketing support consists of a fully integrated program including print advertising in magazines such as Good Housekeeping, freestanding inserts, in-store coupons and consumer events.