EAGLE LAUNCHES IN-STORE MARKETING

MILAN, Ill. -- Eagle Food Centers here launched its first in-store national product marketing program, which allows the retailer to promote national manufacturers' products with the store's logo in strategic areas of the store.The first in-store advertising cycle started Sept. 12 at 90 stores and includes promotions for products from Del Monte, Chex and Aunt Jemima, among others."The signs are designed

MILAN, Ill. -- Eagle Food Centers here launched its first in-store national product marketing program, which allows the retailer to promote national manufacturers' products with the store's logo in strategic areas of the store.

The first in-store advertising cycle started Sept. 12 at 90 stores and includes promotions for products from Del Monte, Chex and Aunt Jemima, among others.

"The signs are designed with our logos and colors and run in a two-week cycle; it's a very easy program," said Patrick Flatley, director of operations for Eagle Food Centers, noting that there about five to seven different signs for every cycle.

"[It's] a national account-specific sign-merchandising program designed for Eagle, a national point-of-purchase shelf-talker," Flatley added.

The advertising system uses a few different types of signs to subtly get the message across to consumers. Some measure 5.5 inches by 7 inches by 11 inches and are used for endcap displays, he told SN. Smaller signs that measure 5.5 inches by 7 inches are referred to as shelf-talkers.

Flatley added that there are also "big signs" that go on display on frozen-section doors. "They hang perpendicular; [they're] not an overpowering sign."

The ads also display the price that the retailer has determined for the product, the retailer said, adding that the signs are run off after the retailer's buying office is contacted to set the promoted product's price.

In between two-week cycles, the retailer is sent replacement signs in case the first set of signs is damaged or dirty.

The past performance of the program in other market areas has shown a "lift" in the promoted products' sales during the cycle, as well as sustained sales after the promotion is ended, according to the retailer.

The marketing program, from Insignia Systems Inc., Minneapolis, is allowing smaller retailers to introduce national promotions that would otherwise be cost-prohibitive, Flatley added.

The program provides manufacturers shorter lead times, no production costs and micromarketing capabilities such as store-specific messaging and multiple language options, according to a source familiar with the situation.