FMI: TV MEDIA COULD STAND TO CLEAN UP ITS ACT, TOO

CHICAGO -- The television media needs to re-examine its motives and methods in reporting on food product safety, Michael Sansolo, the Food Marketing Institute's newly appointed group vice president, said during the FMI Speaks report at last week's annual convention here.rld of products, all too often television reporters have used hidden-camera reports in their never-ending chase for ratings," Sansolo

CHICAGO -- The television media needs to re-examine its motives and methods in reporting on food product safety, Michael Sansolo, the Food Marketing Institute's newly appointed group vice president, said during the FMI Speaks report at last week's annual convention here.

rld of products, all too often television reporters have used hidden-camera reports in their never-ending chase for ratings," Sansolo said.

FMI's Trends survey found 69% of consumers feel product safety is very important in food selection, and 73% believe food products are safe, Sansolo pointed out.

"Even the most outrageous story that says they're being tricked is bound to get attention, headlines and ratings. FMI's policy is, there is no excuse for any practices that cheat or mislead customers. We would like to see the media adopt a similar standard -- there is no excuse for reporting that misleads the public."

Confidence in Food Safety

SHOPPERS WHO ARE COMPLETELY OR MOSTLY CONFIDENT

1991 82%

1992 72%

1993 73%

1994 73%