LIMITED-PLAY DVDS GET ANOTHER LOOK

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- SpectraDisc, here, has come up with another technology that will enable limited play DVDs, but this time without the phone-line based infrastructure of Divx. If the technology is accepted, it will allow consumers to acquire DVD movies at rental pricing and then dispose of them when they are done, said Nabil M. Lawandy, chief executive officer.s no need for the telecommunications

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- SpectraDisc, here, has come up with another technology that will enable limited play DVDs, but this time without the phone-line based infrastructure of Divx. If the technology is accepted, it will allow consumers to acquire DVD movies at rental pricing and then dispose of them when they are done, said Nabil M. Lawandy, chief executive officer.

s no need for the telecommunications with a central computer.

Two Decisions Favor Studios in DVD Security Case

NEW YORK -- The movie studios fought in court here and in Santa Clara, Calif., to keep a formula for cracking the DVD encryption code off the Internet. The software, called DeCSS, was developed by a 15-year-old boy in Norway and made public last fall.

This month, judicial decisions in both cases came down favoring the studios. In New York, a federal judge granted the industry's request for a restraining order against the Web sites that posted the program, as did the judge in the Santa Clara case.

"I think this serves as a wake-up call to anyone who contemplates stealing intellectual property," said Jack Valenti, president and chief executive officer, Motion Picture Association of America, Los Angeles.

But the rulings are being contested. However, it hasn't deterred the studios marketing plans for DVD.