MICROWAVE SUSCEPTOR LAUNCHED

A new microwave susceptor being launched by A.D. Tech., Taunton, Mass., is designed to improve browning and crisping of food without charring the package. The first commercial use of A.D. Tech's patent-pending Safety Susceptor material is in a consumer product, Accu-Crisp microwave cooking bags, which reportedly permit microwave cooking of foods previously thought to be nonmicrowavable. Working much

A new microwave susceptor being launched by A.D. Tech., Taunton, Mass., is designed to improve browning and crisping of food without charring the package. The first commercial use of A.D. Tech's patent-pending Safety Susceptor material is in a consumer product, Accu-Crisp microwave cooking bags, which reportedly permit microwave cooking of foods previously thought to be nonmicrowavable. Working much like a fuse box, fusible links in the pattern-metallized material melt when temperatures get too hot, halting heat generation in that area of the package. The design of the self-regulating susceptor also allows the bag to optimize heating to the shape of the food and oven characteristics.

In preparation for a retail launch, the bags are being sold via a television advertising campaign. An infomercial also is planned. In addition, several food companies are reported to be considering the material for use in their packaging.