MINYARD CONVERTS 36 STORES TO RADIO FREQUENCY EAS

COPPELL, Texas -- Minyard Food Stores here is seeking to reduce false alarms while maintaining its fight against shoplifters with the installation of radio frequency electronic article surveillance tags in 36 stores. The rollout is expected to be complete within three months.Minyard is converting 33 stores from a magnetic-based technology to the RF tags. In addition, three new stores currently being

COPPELL, Texas -- Minyard Food Stores here is seeking to reduce false alarms while maintaining its fight against shoplifters with the installation of radio frequency electronic article surveillance tags in 36 stores. The rollout is expected to be complete within three months.

Minyard is converting 33 stores from a magnetic-based technology to the RF tags. In addition, three new stores currently being constructed will also use the new EAS system. Minyard began installing the RF tags last month.

"We are looking forward to the improved deactivation and detection accuracy that is provided by RF," said Ben Rowe, vice president of risk management for Minyard. "We did well with our magnetic technology, but with a strengthened system we expect to see better results than in the past."

Minyard will be installing approximately 10,000 tags per store. The tags, provided by Checkpoint Systems, Thorofare, N.J., will be attached to high-ticket items including meat, razors, and child care products. Deactivation takes place at the point-of-sale, via an antenna integrated into the POS system.

"It is important to us that if a tag is not deactivated and the alarm sounds, that we do not make customers feel awkward," Rowe explained. "If false alarms continue to happen, customers get a bad perception of the store, store managers could have trouble supporting the system, and thieves could take advantage. This more accurate system should correct that."