NEWS ROUNDUP

N.Y. State Growers Using IPM of New York state growers are using at least one form of Integrated Pest Management, according to a report recently released by Cornell University here.The New York State Integrated Pest Management Program's 1996 Annual Report also found that hundreds of state growers rely completely on IPM practices. Forty-five IPM projects in 33 New York counties were funded in 1995,

N.Y. State Growers Using IPM

of New York state growers are using at least one form of Integrated Pest Management, according to a report recently released by Cornell University here.

The New York State Integrated Pest Management Program's 1996 Annual Report also found that hundreds of state growers rely completely on IPM practices. Forty-five IPM projects in 33 New York counties were funded in 1995, according to the report. The report listed several IPM projects from last year, including the use of bees to control a strawberry disease and controlling onion maggots by rotating onion crops with Sudan grasses and planting genetically pest-resistant onion varieties.

The report also cited many squash, melon, cucumber and pumpkin growers who followed IPM protocols and saved an average of three insecticide applications last season.

In the last decade, the New York Legislature has appropriated $7.9 million for IPM, while researchers have attracted more than $800,000 in federal funds. Growers have also contributed $2 million over the last 10 years, the report said.

"Agriculture isn't the same as it was 10 years ago," said James P. Tette, director of the program. "Producers understand IPM and biological control, and they want to incorporate these practices into their production systems.

"Consumers have changed in the past 10 years, too," Tette continued. "They still want blemish-free fruits and vegetables, but they also seek a food supply that has fewer synthetic pesticides."

IPM is the multistrategy approach used to reduce pesticide use while obtaining high yields. Examples include crop rotation, the use of natural and biological control methods, pest-resistant plant varieties, biopesticides and pest attractants and repellents, according to Cornell.

FMA Planning Shrinkage Project

NEWARK, Del. -- The Floral Marketing Association hopes to begin production in July on a video and workbook project to help supermarkets reduce shrink.

The new project will be designed to help store-level personnel correct poor practices and teach more realistic care and handling practices to reduce shrink and provide greater customer satisfaction.

According to the Food Marketing Institute's 1994 Industry Speaks survey, the average supermarket floral department loses 10% of its product to shrink, FMA said.

Carolyn Donofrio at FMA said the association is seeking industry contributions for the project before it can begin.

Boskovich Buys Equity Interest

OXNARD, Calif. -- Boskovich Farms here has purchased an equity interest in Fresh Prep, a fresh-cut processor also based here.

While continuing to offer whole fresh vegetables, Boskovich now plans to expand its product line to include more fresh-cuts. Fresh Prep, meanwhile, will continue to pack its own Fresh Prep label, along with the Boskovich label.

Boskovich will handle the merchandising and marketing aspects of the business, while Fresh Prep will concentrate on sourcing raw product and processing, according to Boskovich officials.

Cherry Central Offers Fruit Mix

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. -- Cherry Central Cooperative has introduced Traverse Bay Berry & Cherry Dried Fruit. The mix consists of dried cherries, blueberries and cranberries and is available in 1 ounce and 3.53 ounce packages. Berry & Cherry contains no preservatives or sulfites and is fat free, according to the company.