NEWS ROUNDUP

QFC Plunges for SeafoodWhile supermarkets across the United States are featuring fried and rotisserie chicken at hot prices, Quality Food Centers here has stayed out of the fray by spotlighting a different protein source as its meal of the week.In a recent ad for its full-service deli, the 59-unit QFC touted halibut or shrimp, with jo jo potatoes at $2.99. The regular price is $3.99.The ad read, "New!

QFC Plunges for Seafood

While supermarkets across the United States are featuring fried and rotisserie chicken at hot prices, Quality Food Centers here has stayed out of the fray by spotlighting a different protein source as its meal of the week.

In a recent ad for its full-service deli, the 59-unit QFC touted halibut or shrimp, with jo jo potatoes at $2.99. The regular price is $3.99.

The ad read, "New! Halibut and jo jos or shrimp and jo jos. Makes a delicious, quick lunch."

Meanwhile, the Seattle division of Safeway Inc., Oakland, Calif., featured eight pieces of fried chicken for $3.99. Two weeks earlier, in a "double chicken deal," that Safeway division devoted a sixth of a page to an ad that showed roasted chickens on serving plates. The price: two for $7.

Officials at QFC and Safeway's Seattle division could not be reached for comment about the promotions.

Solganik to Conduct Workshop

DAYTON, Ohio -- Solganik & Associates, a retail prepared foods consulting firm here, will conduct a workshop on entrees, soups and sides, Aug. 22-25.

Recipes, costing, shelf life, packaging and merchandising will be covered in that seminar, said company representatives.

The hands-on course, which will focus on approaches to offering the whole meal, will be held in the company's supermarket food-service center. The facility includes a fully equipped kitchen for food preparation, according to Howard Solganik, president.

Another workshop, scheduled for Oct. 17-20, will put emphasis on modernizing traditional delis by adding selected food-service programs.

For more information about the seminar programs, call the firm at (513) 438-1666.

Fat-Free Turkey Joins Alpine Line

MAPLEWOOD, N.J. -- Alpine Lace Brands here has introduced fat-free turkey to its line-up of reduced-fat and reduced-sodium meats and cheeses.

While the company recently developed a 97% fat-free and reduced-sodium ham, the turkey is its first fat-free meat.

The product, sold under the Alpine Lace label in supermarket delis, is also low in sodium and has 22 calories per ounce, a company source said. "We are rolling it out nationally and expect it will be in most supermarkets by late summer or fall," said Carl Wolf, Alpine Lace president and chief executive officer.

The fat-free turkey got a send-off at, of all places, New York City's Carnegie Deli, where traditionally there has not been emphasis on fat-free anything. The Carnegie Deli, in fact, is renowned for its over-stuffed, more-than-you-can-eat, sandwiches. Introducing the product there, where taste and quantity are priorities, sent a positive message to the public about the product and attracted consumer media attention, a spokeswoman said. In that respect, it was expected to help, too, that supermodel Kim Alexis talked the fat-free product up at the press event.

Saval Introduces Kosher Meats

BALTIMORE -- Saval Foods here, a manufacturer of corned beef, roast beef and pastrami, has introduced a kosher line of meats which features kosher salami, bologna, kishka, frankfurters and knockwurst.

The family-owned company, in business since the 1930s, has a manufacturing facility here, and has regional distribution in the Mid-Atlantic area.

Grand Union Promotes Chicken

WAYNE, N.J. -- The Grand Union Co. here recently offered a free side order with the purchase of a rotisserie chicken from the deli.

The "Corner Deli" segment of the chain's advertisement read, "Free side order when you purchase one rotisserie chicken at our regular low price."

A store-level source in a Grand Union in Montvale, N.J., said the regular price of rotisserie chickens is $2.99 per pound. Officials at the 256-unit chain's corporate office could not be reached for comment on the program.