NEWS ROUNDUP

Tyson Starts food-Safety DriveFoods here has launched a consumer-education campaign emphasizing food safety and its relation to poultry products.The program, called "Cooking Smart, The 3 C's," is designed to remind consumers how to correctly handle and prepare fresh chickens."The 3 C's" logo has been designed to further simplify the safety message.Standing for "chill, clean and cook," the logo appears

Tyson Starts food-Safety Drive

Foods here has launched a consumer-education campaign emphasizing food safety and its relation to poultry products.

The program, called "Cooking Smart, The 3 C's," is designed to remind consumers how to correctly handle and prepare fresh chickens.

"The 3 C's" logo has been designed to further simplify the safety message.

Standing for "chill, clean and cook," the logo appears on all of Tyson's fresh chicken products, as well as related program materials including accordion-style foldout recipe booklets and refrigerator magnets. The materials are distributed through retail stores, cooking schools and consumer shows.

Included is a breakdown of The 3 C's: "Chill" emphasizes the importance of storing chicken at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below until it's ready to be cooked; "clean" reminds consumers to wash their hands, and disinfect cutting boards, counter tops and utensils before and after handling food; and "cook," reinforces using a meat thermometer to maintain proper cooking temperatures.

In addition, Tyson has posted the food-safety message on its Web site. A special link on its homepage leads directly to the "Cooking Smart" page, containing tips on proper storage and preparation methods and a how-to section on planning for outdoor events. An optional quiz checks the user's knowledge of proper handling techniques.

Quaker Maid Meats: A for Safety

READING, Pa. -- Quaker Maid Meats announced it has received a high overall score, categorized as "excellent," following a safety audit of its processing facilities. The review, conducted by a third-party independent firm, measured food-safety compliance in eight categories, affecting all areas of production, including food-safety systems, grounds, pest control, shipping/receiving/storage and employee practices.

Assessments were made through plant observations and from company records, which included data from the company's own Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point program. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has made HACCP mandatory for all larger processing plants.