NEWS ROUNDUP

NCBA Reports Beef Price Dropage retail prices for beef dropped a few cents in August, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association here reported.The average price of six cuts in August was $2.95 per pound, compared with $2.97 in July and $3.12 in August 1995, according to an NCBA statement.While the average price has remained relatively stable this summer, it is still among the lowest on record, the

NCBA Reports Beef Price Drop

age retail prices for beef dropped a few cents in August, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association here reported.

The average price of six cuts in August was $2.95 per pound, compared with $2.97 in July and $3.12 in August 1995, according to an NCBA statement.

While the average price has remained relatively stable this summer, it is still among the lowest on record, the statement said.

Notable fluctuations included a comparatively large drop in T-bone steak prices, down to $5.59 per pound, and an increase in chuck roll roast, to $2.39.

Beef supply is expected to remain abundant, and wholesale prices are not expected to increase substantially.

NFI: Salmon Consumption Up

ARLINGTON, Va. -- Consumption of salmon increased again in 1995 and is expected to keep rising, according to the National Fisheries Institute, based here.

Per capita consumption for the popular fish increased 0.3 pounds in 1995 over 1994, NFI reported.

"Excellent harvests of salmon from Alaskan resources, as well as growing aquaculture production throughout the world, have resulted in plentiful supplies of high-quality product," said executive vice president Lee J. Weddig in a statement.

"Salmon consumption should continue to rise in 1996 and beyond."

NFI cited aggressive marketing by the industry, coupled with promotional efforts by the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute and Salmon Marketers International, as instrumental in this upswing.

"For salmon, particularly farmed salmon, the big story is supermarket sales," according to SMI spokeswoman Jeanne McKnight.

"Supermarkets are doing well with salmon, and these numbers tell the story."

One of the marketing programs initiated through SMI is a radio campaign at rush hours to encourage consumers to buy fresh salmon for dinner. McKnight said it results in over 30 consumer impressions through 200 spots per week, per market.

Other fresh seafood that retained places at the top of the list in 1995 were shrimp and Alaskan pollock, with shrimp consumption dropping 0.1 pound and pollock remaining steady at 1.5 pounds per capita, according to NFI.