NEWS WATCH: MAGAZINE PROMOTION URGES CONSUMERS TO 'READ ON'... YOUNG PEOPLE 'MULTI-TASK' IN MEDIA USE: KAISER STUDY

MAGAZINE PROMOTION URGES CONSUMERS TO 'READ ON'ear, $40-million multimedia campaign will hit its stride next month with futuristic wrap-around covers on weekly and monthly publications. Based on the tagline, "Read on," the promotion uses images of consumers reading magazines in imagined futuristic scenes and mock covers. For example, a cover of Time refers to a story about "Android Rights: Is Owning

MAGAZINE PROMOTION URGES CONSUMERS TO 'READ ON'

ear, $40-million multimedia campaign will hit its stride next month with futuristic wrap-around covers on weekly and monthly publications. Based on the tagline, "Read on," the promotion uses images of consumers reading magazines in imagined futuristic scenes and mock covers. For example, a cover of Time refers to a story about "Android Rights: Is Owning One Unconstitutional," and a Newsweek cover has a story headlined, "Clones in the Military: Don't Ask - Don't Tell." "The campaign plays on the idea that in an increasingly complicated world, with even more media disruptions and an impersonal, high-tech, digital landscape, consumers continue to choose magazines," said Nina Link, president and chief executive officer, Magazine Publishers of America here.

YOUNG PEOPLE 'MULTI-TASK' IN MEDIA USE: KAISER STUDY

WASHINGTON -- While children and teens spend an increasing amount of time using "new media," such as computers, the Internet and video games, they have not cut back on the time spent with old media forms, such as television, print and music, according to a study by the Kaiser Family Foundation here. By spending time using more than one medium at a time, they consume a growing amount of content in the same amount of time each day, the foundation said in a statement. "Kids are multi-tasking and consuming many different kinds of media all at once," said Drew Altman, president and chief executive officer, Kaiser Family Foundation. "Multi-tasking is a growing phenomenon in media use, and we don't know whether it's good or bad, or both."