NEWS WATCH: SCIENTISTS URGE CONSUMERS TO KEEP EATING SALMON...SCHNUCK MARKETS TEAMS UP WITH ST. LOUIS CARDINALS...SEAFOOD GROUP LAUNCHES CATANZARO MEMORIAL FUND

SCIENTISTS URGE CONSUMERS TO KEEP EATING SALMONals were encouraging consumers to keep eating salmon and not be alarmed by a new study that showed trace amounts of flame retardants in wild and farmed salmon. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers, similar to PCBs, have turned up in commercially sold farmed and wild salmon, in amounts that vary depending on where the fish were raised, according to a study published

SCIENTISTS URGE CONSUMERS TO KEEP EATING SALMON

als were encouraging consumers to keep eating salmon and not be alarmed by a new study that showed trace amounts of flame retardants in wild and farmed salmon. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers, similar to PCBs, have turned up in commercially sold farmed and wild salmon, in amounts that vary depending on where the fish were raised, according to a study published earlier this month in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The study indicated levels of PBDEs were found to be higher in farm-raised salmon. Consumers are exposed to PBDEs every day, said scientists who were quoted in a news release issued by Salmon of the Americas, a trade group representing salmon farmers, based here. The substances are found in many other foods and in ordinary household dust, the scientists said, adding consumers should balance the health benefits associated with eating salmon against the slightly increased exposure to PBDEs. Calling the study "misleading" and "confusing," the National Fisheries Institute noted on its Web site that there have been no conclusive studies conducted on the human health effects of PBDEs. McLean, Va.-based NFI is the leading trade association for the fish and seafood industry.

SCHNUCK MARKETS TEAMS UP WITH ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

ST. LOUIS -- Schnuck Markets teamed up this summer with the St. Louis Cardinals to promote Certified Angus Beef and Amazing Taste Foods meat seasoning. Though promoting Certified Angus Beef is an annual summer event for Schnucks, the promotion took on a new twist with participation this year from the Cardinals and Malibu, Calif.-based Amazing Taste. Officials said the three-week grilling promotion aimed to steer customers to various cuts of Certified Angus beef carried in Schnucks' service counters and self-service cases. With each purchase, customers received a free packet of Amazing Taste sprinkle-on seasoning. The promotion utilized several media to get the message across to consumers, officials said. The local team plugged the products through announcements made during Cardinals' games. The campaign also featured radio and print ads in the retailer's weekly circulars, in-store, point-of-sale materials and a live radio remote from one of Schnucks' high-volume stores.

SEAFOOD GROUP LAUNCHES CATANZARO MEMORIAL FUND

McLEAN, Va. -- The National Fisheries Institute last week started a Memorial Scholarship Fund in honor of Rich Catanzaro, former director of seafood for San Antonio-based H.E. Butt Grocery, who was killed in March. Catanzaro's 30 years in the seafood industry led to leadership roles at NFI, speaking engagements at industry events throughout the world and testimony before the International Trade Commission. When the scholarship is fully funded, it will be given to one student each year for the advancement of marketing in the seafood industry.

AMI ROLLS OUT MEAT SAFETY WEB SITE

ARLINGTON, Va. -- The American Meat Institute has rolled out a new Web site, www.meatsafety.org, that offers consumers and the media comprehensive information about meat and poultry safety, as well as detailed information on safe cooking, handling and storage of meat and poultry products. The site, which was reviewed by staff members at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline, also includes links to nutrition guidelines, food safety publications and articles, and a "Hot Topics" section for the latest news on food safety. Officials said the site will be updated routinely to keep the contents timely. In addition, the site features a "Food Safety Quiz" for consumers to test their knowledge of food safety in five minutes. Of interest to the media, the site also has an array of fact sheets, charts, links and articles on relevant topics, officials said.