STUDY: SHOPPERS WANT TO KNOW ABOUT SAVINGS

WASHINGTON -- While supermarket shoppers have more time to absorb sophisticated in-store marketing messages, hurried c-store shoppers are more focused on the value proposition by various ad campaigns, according to new data from the c-store phase of a multiyear Point of Purchase Advertising International study.to survey results.Findings from the study's supermarket phase showed that themed advertising

WASHINGTON -- While supermarket shoppers have more time to absorb sophisticated in-store marketing messages, hurried c-store shoppers are more focused on the value proposition by various ad campaigns, according to new data from the c-store phase of a multiyear Point of Purchase Advertising International study.

to survey results.

Findings from the study's supermarket phase showed that themed advertising -- such as the Super Bowl or summer picnics -- was one of the most prominent forms audited. In comparison, in the study's c-store phase, only 26% of the ad messages were thematic. "Offer" and "retail savings" messages constituted almost 36% of all ads in c-stores. These were not merely "price" messages; rather, they were messages that communicated the product discount or premium offer. The offer and retail savings messages generated significantly higher levels of recall from consumers.

To date, POPAI has collected results from more than 1,200 consumer interviews conducted at five retail locations across six markets.

The c-store phase of the study, called "In-Store Advertising Becomes a Measured Medium," is being sponsored by Anheuser-Busch, Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Frito-Lay, Pepsi, the Adams division of Pfizer, and Quaker. It is being conducted in conjunction with the National Association of Convenience Stores.

Earlier findings showed that c-store consumers recall the presence of in-store advertising at a rate of 40%. Among other results:

Consumers recalled in-store advertising for an average of 29% of all products purchased, with carbonated beverages, cigarettes and coffee experiencing the highest rates. Seventy-nine percent of respondents said that in-store ads provide "helpful" information; 59% indicated that they appreciate the degree to which in-store ads educate about product benefits.

Seventy-nine percent believe their store has the right amount of in-store advertising; an additional 10% say they want more in-store advertising.

Sixty-nine percent indicated that window ads caught their attention.

Forty-three percent of ads were found either at the aisle or cooler; 38% were seen outside, usually in the window, or on the gas pump.