Higher Income Shoppers More Cost-Conscious

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Adults with higher income and education levels are more likely to employ coupons and other money-saving strategies, according to a new survey conducted by Harris Interactive and commissioned by Coupons.com here.

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Adults with higher income and education levels are more likely to employ coupons and other money-saving strategies, according to a new survey conducted by Harris Interactive and commissioned by Coupons.com [2] here.

Households with incomes in the $75,000 to $100,000 range were more likely than households that make less than $35,000 per year to employ saving strategies, including coupons (81% compared with 63%); compare unit prices of package sizes (88% versus 61%); stock up when items reach rock bottom prices (73% versus 65%) and buy in bulk (68% compared with 54%).

Adults with college degrees are not only significantly more likely to plan to use coupons than those without high school degrees (78% vs. 51%), but they also plan to use other savings tactics more frequently, including comparing unit prices (83% vs. 66%) and buying in bulk (62% vs. 42%).

Men and women also take different approaches to saving money, said the study: Women are more likely to use coupons to gain more savings compared to men (78% vs. 66%); they are also more likely to compare unit prices of package sizes over men (75% vs. 67%) and stock up on goods when they reach rock-bottom prices (68% vs. 60%). However, male adults (59%) are more likely to buy in bulk than their female (55%) counterparts.

Overall, the survey found that incorporating coupons was the most popular planned activity to off-set rising food prices, with 72% citing it, followed by other budget-stretching actions: Comparing unit prices of package sizes (71%); shopping at discount grocery stores (66%); stocking up when items reach rock-bottom prices (64%); buying in bulk (57%).