Mintel: Nutritional Messaging Not Lost on Young People

CHICAGO — The eating habits of children and teens may not be so bad after all, show the findings of a Mintel study.

CHICAGO — The eating habits of children and teens may not be so bad after all, show the findings of a Mintel study. When asked why they eat what they eat 42% of kids and teens polled said it was to gain more energy, 35% purposefully eat foods that are rich in vitamins and nutrients, 25% try to eat foods that are low in fat and 22% look for foods low in sugar. The majority of young people are eating most meals at home. Sixty-five percent of respondents said they eat dinner at home at least five times a week, and 33% do so daily. "Health and wellness campaigns have impacted kids' and teens' food perceptions, but they haven't completely changed their eating habits” said Chris Haack, senior analyst at Mintel, in a statement. “Companies need to find ways to reinvent home-based meals and energize healthy snacking, so today's youth can see the benefits of better nutrition and take action.” Teens may be more receptive to these foods. When asked about their attitudes toward food, 66% said they believe that “eating gives you energy/vitality,” while 61% said “it’s important to eat a balanced diet.”

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