Card-Checks Likely 'Behind Us'

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — With expected changes in Congress after the November elections, "it looks like card-checks are behind us," Leslie Dach, executive vice president of corporate affairs and government relations for Wal-Mart Stores, told investors here Tuesday night at the company's 17th annual meeting for the investment community.

BENTONVILLE, Ark. — With expected changes in Congress after the November elections, "it looks like card-checks are behind us," Leslie Dach, executive vice president of corporate affairs and government relations for Wal-Mart Stores [3], told investors here Tuesday night at the company's 17th annual meeting for the investment community.

"It's clear this environment makes it less likely — and nearly impossible — for a card-check bill to pass," he said. Card-check is a method by which employees could authorize a union if a majority says it wants to be represented.

Looking beyond the election, Dach said the single most important thing lawmakers in Washington, D.C., can do is "put people back to work and make them feel better about the economy so consumers have the confidence to spend. This is not an ideological issue — we hope those on both sides of the aisle will come up with solutions."

Dach also said he expects "a meaningful conversation" in Congress over tax issues, "but it will take a lot of debate for U.S. businesses to benefit because of the need to pay for various programs, and the crystal ball is murky on whether the U.S. can do that [and still reduce taxes]."