New Nash Finch Store Spotlights Perishables

Family Fresh Market, the first store in a new format developed by Nash Finch, focuses on helping shoppers make healthier and more nutritionally balanced choices. The store was specifically designed to provide a convenient shopping experience that feeds the senses in all aspects, said Brian Numainville, spokesman for the Edina, Minn.-based company. Our construction and store design team

HUDSON, Wis — Family Fresh Market, the first store in a new format developed by Nash Finch, focuses on helping shoppers make healthier and more nutritionally balanced choices.

“The store was specifically designed to provide a convenient shopping experience that ‘feeds the senses’ in all aspects,” said Brian Numainville, spokesman for the Edina, Minn.-based company. “Our construction and store design team collaborated with our retail and merchandising experts to create an environment that delivers exciting solutions throughout the shopping trip, in every department of the store.”

The Hudson location is the first of a planned nationwide rollout of Family Fresh stores. Currently, one store changeover is already in the works, and three other sites are under consideration, Numainville confirmed.

The $4.5 billion food retailer/wholesaler designed the new store around an extensive expansion of perishables departments, which take up 45% of the selling floor. The meat and organic produce sections, in particular, are nearly twice as large as those found in typical supermarkets, according to Numainville. As a result, the store can carry more than 150 organic produce items. The site was chosen because of the ample footprint provided by a former Econofoods store located there, as well as the area's demographics.

“Fresh, high-quality perishables are very important, especially to health-conscious shoppers today,” Numainville said. “With this in mind, an expanded selection offers our shoppers many choices to plan well-balanced and convenient meals with distinctive, and in some cases unique, products.”

Not only does the new store tout a larger produce section, there are also changes on a smaller scale, including smaller serving sizes for “grab-and-go” items and recycled packaging used with some floral arrangements. Also, the store's meat department is full-service.

“One of the distinguishing features is our old-fashioned, full-service meat department, featuring Angus Pride beef, where our butchers will cut to order and personally sign the order — this is called Our Signature Service,” Numainville told SN. “Also, our expanded seafood department includes fresh salmon every day, wild in-season offerings and well-trained staff.”

In addition to a focus on high-quality perishables, the company is going a few steps further with a trademarked “Well Balanced” consumer education program that purposefully avoids using the word “healthy.”

The store also implements kiosks at the store entrance and in the pharmacy that offer a dozen pamphlets on topics such as heart health, poison prevention, food safety and helping kids enjoy fruits and vegetables.

There are also plans for a nutritionist to join the staff to help answer questions and to work with local hospitals, health clubs and consumer groups.

“There is a direct connection between action and awareness, and we feel it's important to provide shoppers with information that allows them make the best choices to meet their personal health and lifestyle needs,” Numainville said.