Clinical-Strength Antiperspirants Branching Out

Here are some category extensions and marketing angles that clinical-strength antiperspirants might have a future stake in: Private Label: Clinical-strength antiperspirants offer private label an opportunity, because they are priced so much higher than standard versions, according to Al Jones, senior vice president, procurement and marketing, Imperial Distributors, Auburn, Mass. As long as you can

Here are some category extensions and marketing angles that clinical-strength antiperspirants might have a future stake in:

Private Label: Clinical-strength antiperspirants offer private label an opportunity, because they are priced so much higher than standard versions, according to Al Jones, senior vice president, procurement and marketing, Imperial Distributors, Auburn, Mass.

“As long as you can convince a consumer that the product is good, then maybe this is an area where private label will succeed where it hasn't in the past,” he said. “People may give it a shot. But deodorants and antiperspirants have never been strong in private label. If a consumer has to choose between a basic name brand at $1.99 and a private label at $1.50, that consumer will generally go with the name brand.”

Gender Segregation: Separating standard deodorants and antiperspirants into distinct packaging and shelf placements has been a successful marketing move in the past. But will it continue?

“Absolutely,” said Jim Wisner, president of Wisner Marketing Group, Libertyville, Ill. He explained how the marketing of personal care products specifically toward men is “classic brand positioning,” where products are positioned not only according to what their functional value is, but also how they correspond to a consumer's personal image and lifestyle. “And it worked.

Clinical-strength antiperspirants are already moving into this area. Degree, for instance, divides its products into men's and women's.

Trial Size: Standard deodorants in trial sizes have a devoted following, particularly because of new travel regulations. “They are selling because the airline rules have really driven their growth,” said Jones. “If you want to have carry-on luggage on an airplane, you've got to have them.”

These miniatures can actually work well for a company when they are marketed for actual trial. Brut is encouraging users to try its “clinically proven” antiperspirants through this method.