Plant-based milks are moving in store Courtesy of Oatly

Plant-based milks are moving in store

Customers look beyond established alternatives like soy, almond and coconut

Alternatives to traditional cow’s milk have been around for a while, often purchased by those who couldn’t tolerate dairy. But over the last decade, customers began choosing non-dairy milks like soy, almond and coconut for taste, health and ethical reasons. Today, non-dairy milks with new and unusual ingredients and flavors have risen in popularity. “While almond, coconut and soy milks remain the most popular types of non-dairy milk, other nut and plant bases are gaining traction,” said Megan Hambleton, beverage analyst at market research firm Mintel in a report. The entire non-dairy milk segment has seen steady growth over the past five years, according to the report. Sales have grown 61% since 2012, and are estimated to have reached $2.11 billion in 2017.

Courtesy of Oatly

Coffee-shop to consumer

Swedish company Oatly started its U.S. market push at specialty coffee shops. Once baristas and their customers embraced the creamy, fiber-rich milk, Oatly began selling products like its original Oat Milk at supermarkets.

us.oatly.com

Courtesy of MALK

Perfect pairing

Maple Pecan MALK blends organic Texas pecans with organic maple syrup and a touch of natural vanilla. All MALK products are made with six ingredients or less and with more than one cup of sprouted organic nuts per bottle.

malkorganics.com

Courtesy of Elmhurst

A change in operations

Since 1925, Elmhurst has been in the milk business. But in 2017 the company moved from a traditional dairy to Elmhurst Milked and began producing nut- and grain-based milks using a patented technology that allows the company to produce nutrient-dense milks without additives. Among the company’s new product flavors is Milked Peanuts.

elmhurst1925.com 

Courtesy of Ripple Chocolate

For the sweet tooth

Plant-based milks can still be fun. Ripple Chocolate pea protein milk provides a classic chocolate milk taste with 8 grams of protein and 50% more calcium than 2% dairy milk.

ripplefoods.com 

Courtesy of Good Karma Flaxmilk

Flax attack

Good Karma Flaxmilk boosts 1,200 mg of Omega-3 and as much calcium as milk. The company’s new shelf-stable line has an added protein boost and bottles sized for lunch boxes.

goodkarmafoods.com

Contact Gloria Dawson at gloria.dawson@knect365.com 

Follow her on Twitter: @GloriaDawson

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