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According to Reuters, Walmart is facing 21 NLRB complaints from workers or unions regarding efforts to discourage the formation of labor groups.

Walmart faces another NLRB complaint dealing with unions

Workers at a store in California allegedly dealt with anti-union actions

A Walmart store in California may have been involved in a series of union-busting tactics, reports Reuters.

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has issued a complaint stating that Walmart questioned employees at a Eureka, Calif., store about union activities, pulled union flyers from a break room, and threatened workers who provided union information.

If Walmart does not settle the claim, there will be a hearing in May.

“We strive to create an environment of open communication and respect our associates’ rights to share their ideas, feedback, and concerns. We look forward to sharing the facts and addressing the inaccuracies during the legal process,” Walmart said in an emailed statement to Supermarket News.

According to Reuters, Walmart is facing 21 NLRB complaints from workers or unions regarding efforts to discourage the formation of labor groups. The NLRB has begun proceedings in four of the cases to date, reports Reuters.

Earlier this week, the NLRB filed a complaint against a Trader Joe’s wine store in New York City after employees at the store filed an Unfair Labor Practice charge that outlines several incidents that happened in July and August 2022 which eventually led to the location going dark on Aug. 11, 2022.

According to the complaint, after employees were interrogated about union activities, they were told they could lose their benefits if a union was formed, and that management would not bargain with a union.

The NLRB wants the store to be reopened with the original staff, who will then be allowed to form a union.

Trader Joe’s also has until Jan. 26 to answer questions about why certain actions were taken and why the decision was made to close.

A hearing is scheduled for May 7.

 

 

 

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